Other Ancillary Subjects


Many professional performers work freelance and are, therefore, self-employed. The Corps of Army Music is currently the UK’s largest employer of professional instrumentalists offering a career up to the age of 55. For orchestral players, employers include ballet, symphony, opera and chamber orchestras some of whom will be large enough to employ musicians on full-time contracts. These employers will also employ people on a freelance basis to play specialist instruments, for certain performances and to cover absences, e.g. for those on maternity leave.

Self-governing orchestras, which tend to be less financially secure than the bigger orchestras, will employ musicians on a regular basis, but tend to pay their musicians as freelancers rather than as salaried employees.

There is also occasional work offered by independent fixers for choral society performances, recording sessions and outdoor performances. Freelance musicians or permanent staff can take on this ad hoc work.

The most common employers of singers are opera companies, as there are very few professional choirs. This can lead to other employment opportunities as many of the larger choral societies employ opera singers for solo and oratorio work.

Musician

Hello;
I am looking for work in Reklam,TV,Film, or on Stage. I am Stephen IronMan McNatt
I’m an actor / stuntman / special effects tec, I am 47 years old and married, I am Native American I dance mens traditional play the flute and tell old tribal storys I look in my 30’s I have Long brown hair and eyes I weigh 200 lbs and I am 5ft 9 inches tall and I am in great shape I worked with Helsingborg Theater 2005 in the show Mice and Men it was the most popular show in the history of that theater and was extended twice, my
roll was one of the prime supporting players. I can become anyone and become anything I am needed to I am a character actor, a gaffer a special effects technician a stuntman, fight coordinator, firearms expert, as a second job I teach and lecture on Native American Tribal Culture and History. I take direction well and I LOVE TO WORK. I will relocate for work and I will travel I am sorry but I don’t speak Swedish well But
can do lines in Swedish with practice.

past work
NORTH & SOUTH 1 and 2, GODS AND GENERALS , COLD Strager Still MOUNTAIN,and GLORY
I was a Union Cav Solder in all 3 films and stuntman I did stunts on and off horse back and fought with sabers hand to hand and with Knives and helped to choreograph some of the knife and hand to hand fighting sequences.

WIND RIVER, SMOKE SIGNALS and DANCES WITH WOLFS
Played a Native American in all 3 films, in Wind River I was a stuntman and one of the assistant fight coordinators and also an extra. In Smoke Signals I was an assistant stunt technician and Native American extra, in Dances with Wolfs I was again a Native American and stuntman, and was also employed as a
gaffer.
I can start now anytime Please I need a job if you can use some one that is able and
willing to do anything you have please call me

Thank you.
MVH

Stephen IronMan McNatt
ironmanmcnatt@yahoo.com
Vintergatan 8 B
26731 Bjuv
Sweden
H–042-82-823

This is a bit of fun for those with the blues

Optical Illusions

Optical Illusions Cheer me up: This takes a short while to load in here, but its worth it

 

 

Visitors have already noticed the new links in the left-hand column to the publisher of my book Writing for the Web 3.0. This is third edition of a book first published in 1999, when the subject was very new. If your goal is to see your fiction as print on paper, W4W3.0 probably won’t help much—though I think its argument for simple, clear text applies in most genres.Cucumber

A commenter asks which way I make the most money; I do get a little extra if you click through the link to Self-Counsel Press and buy the book right on the publisher’s website.

Next on my agenda is a second edition of Writing Science Fiction and Fantasy, first published in 1998. Look for a link to it next month.

I have noticed a trend in the past few years, scam artists are getting smarter in the modeling biz! Years ago there were only a few and it was obvious who was what. Lately, even I have been shocked at what these crooks have cooked up. These individuals have gotten smarter and realize new faces in the industry are more educated, thus they have gotten more creative in their attempts to hide the real deal.

Here are a few reoccurring scams I’d like to point out to help all of you save time and money!

By far, the most popular scam is what we call a photo mill.

This is an agency that makes their money by sending models to photographers that are ON STAFF to shoot expensive photos and produce a comp card.

Robbie Mac

These agencies don’t make their money by booking work only selling pricey photography. They sign up anyone with a credit card and book few jobs.

Be suspicious of any company that forces you to shoot with a certain photographer. Normally, that means someone is getting a kick back!

A legitimate agency will give you what they call a testing list. This is a list of all good photographers in your area that you’ll be able to contact and pick on your own. A good agency shouldn’t force you to use their printing company rather suggest one but let you do it on your own should you choose to.

Also, a brand new model should never print more then 500 cards at one shot. If you’re new, chances are your first card isn’t going to be strong. It’s simply just a way to introduce you to clients. You’re going to want to keep shooting to gain experience and update your cards within a few months. So, 500 cards isn’t a good idea. 100-200 cards are enough to get started and they shouldn’t cost more then $1.00 per card to produce.

You shouldn’t have to write your check out to the agency, rather to the printing company directly.

However, this scam does not apply to only the modelling profession, it will also apply to actors, dancers, singers etc.

While transferring hard copy files from the dinky cabinet to the new, shiny monster occupying the corner of my office, I came across a draft pitch sheet with some old novel ideas, like this one:

Hell on Wheels

Paraplegic Mike Anderson becomes stranded during a vacation rafting expedition for the handicapped on the American River. His only help is a newly-blind woman, former neurosurgeon Rebecca Stark. [Stuff happens, they survive.] Back in Florida Keys, Mike helps Becca accept the disability that ended her career, while she secretly arranges for an operation that may restore the use of Mike’s legs [twist: Becca’s eyesight is restored, Mike remains in the chair.] ECD: mid-2002

In those days I always took a pitch sheet with me to any publisher event (something I made a habit of after being cornered by Gina Centrello at a national conference and going completely blank-headed.) At the bottom of this particular sheet I wrote: “Polish, keep in purse.” That came in handy later, when my editor took me out to dinner and asked me what else I was thinking about writing next. I made her laugh when I took the polished version out of my purse and simply handed it to her.

Hell on Wheels was my favorite of the eight premises I pitched to her that night. I had wanted to do a book featuring Mike Anderson, a wheelchair-bound secondary character from my first romance, Paradise Island. I was advised by a RWA friend that the idea it would not fly because both of the main characters were not beautiful, perfect, abled people. I figured that was its strong point.

But my friend was right — my editor didn’t like handicapped heroes or heroines, or the idea that the ending was (in her view) less than happy for one of them. She nixed all seven of the other premises, too. Some were better (as in more mainstream, less risky) than Mike’s story, so it puzzled me.

I found out why when the editor told me the publisher only wanted me to continue the storyline from the trilogy I’d just wrapped up that June. Wrapped up as in finished, done, over, no more stories. Being the cooperative soul that I am, I went home, filed away all my new ideas in my unwritten archives and wrote up what they wanted. Those books became the Jessica Hall novels, which made my publisher happy and added greatly to the savings account.

Stuff happens. You adapt, you compromise, you keep working. Or you don’t. Those are the choices we sometimes have to make between creating art and making a living.

What’s in your unwritten archives?

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