Models


I sent my resume around the internet via Monster and got a hook from a company in Florida. Not unlike a hungry fish, I took the bait and, after paying them $500.00, I am now an Affiliate, meaning I am a sales person who signs pre-qualified leads up for a $50 fee and $20 per month. There’s no yearly contract, so, I was thinking I’m not putting anyone out of much money if it doesn’t work for them; and the company has been very nice, diligent with their training, and straightforward as far as I can tell.

AFTER THE FACT I read on a website and the following facts are emerging much to my disappointment:

FACT: People at casting agencies, modeling agencies, and talent agencies see enough potential models in person and receive enough photos through other means that searching online for “new faces” is unnecessary.”

FACT: Good casting directors, modeling agents, and talent agents are too busy to spend hours online trolling for photos of ‘new faces’.”

Ya reckon I’ve allowed myself to screw myself?

“FACT: I was under the impression that as new faces are always “needed” and as the internet does allow for potential “talent” to be looked at by potential employers, it’s a good thing, and not exploitive.”

Are we now POSITIVE that on-line talent search agencies are unnecessary and thus all just a great deal of hype?

Then it would seem that we need to approach these people (casting directors, modeling agents, and talent agents) directly and this Talented Cafe website does the trick by giving us the email database? Bet there are going to be a LOT of “VERY PISSED OFF” talent agents once this takes hold… Get in line I’m already posting my email. Hahaha!!!

Thanks Talented Cafe People!!!

 

MONTGOMERY CO. MAN ACCUSED OF PERPETRATING TALENT AGENT SCAM
Spitzer’s Office Files Lawsuit Seeking Restitution for Defrauded Actors


Attorney General Eliot Spitzer today announced that his office has filed a lawsuit against a Montgomery County man who scammed dozens of actors into believing he was a talent agent and casting director for major motion picture studios.Eric Charles Roselli, also known as Eric Latham, of Amsterdam, is accused of fraud, deceptive business practices, false advertising and violations of a state law that prohibits advertisements for show business employment opportunities when an advance fee is a condition of employment.

“This individual pretended to be a movie talent agent and nearly convinced many people to pay in advance for an opportunity to appear in a movie,” Spitzer said. “But his claims were not substantiated and my office is now seeking restitution for those who were victimized.”

In June 2003, Roselli placed an advertisement in Backstage Magazine, a publication read by individuals in the entertainment industry. The advertisement invited aspiring actors to call a Manhattan telephone number for information about auditions purportedly affiliated with Paramount Studios and Warner Brothers.

Actors who called were told that auditions were being held at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Albany. Hundreds of individuals traveled to Albany, at their own considerable expense, to appear for the auditions.

Spitzer’s investigation revealed that Roselli was not affiliated with either Castles in the Skystudio and that every actor who auditioned was offered a role by Roselli on the condition that they pay him $552 to join the “Artists Union,” a non-existent entity.

Several actors recognized Roselli’s offer as a scam and reported it to Spitzer’s office. Fortunately, no one paid the fee sought by Roselli.

In filing the lawsuit, Spitzer’s office seeks a court order compelling Roselli to pay full monetary restitution and damages to all aggrieved consumers, civil penalties for his violations of state laws and costs. The lawsuit also seeks a permanent injunction against Roselli barring him from future fraudulent, deceptive and illegal practices.

Individuals wishing to file a complaint against Roselli are encouraged to call the Attorney General’s consumer help line at (800) 771-7755 or visit the office’s web site at www.oag.state.ny.us.

This case is being handled by Principal Attorney Robert Vawter of the Consumer Frauds and Protection Bureau.

I have noticed a trend in the past few years, scam artists are getting smarter in the modeling biz! Years ago there were only a few and it was obvious who was what. Lately, even I have been shocked at what these crooks have cooked up. These individuals have gotten smarter and realize new faces in the industry are more educated, thus they have gotten more creative in their attempts to hide the real deal.

Here are a few reoccurring scams I’d like to point out to help all of you save time and money!

By far, the most popular scam is what we call a photo mill.

This is an agency that makes their money by sending models to photographers that are ON STAFF to shoot expensive photos and produce a comp card.

Robbie Mac

These agencies don’t make their money by booking work only selling pricey photography. They sign up anyone with a credit card and book few jobs.

Be suspicious of any company that forces you to shoot with a certain photographer. Normally, that means someone is getting a kick back!

A legitimate agency will give you what they call a testing list. This is a list of all good photographers in your area that you’ll be able to contact and pick on your own. A good agency shouldn’t force you to use their printing company rather suggest one but let you do it on your own should you choose to.

Also, a brand new model should never print more then 500 cards at one shot. If you’re new, chances are your first card isn’t going to be strong. It’s simply just a way to introduce you to clients. You’re going to want to keep shooting to gain experience and update your cards within a few months. So, 500 cards isn’t a good idea. 100-200 cards are enough to get started and they shouldn’t cost more then $1.00 per card to produce.

You shouldn’t have to write your check out to the agency, rather to the printing company directly.

However, this scam does not apply to only the modelling profession, it will also apply to actors, dancers, singers etc.

Shocking UP-FRONT FEE Results!

 75% Get No Work - The Stage…

 

This is what happens to Liars

 

 

On 27th April 2006, ‘The Stage’ newspaper reported their results, of their damning survey report, which stated: “Three-quarters of people paying up-front fees to agents in the entertainment industry receive no work from them in the following 12 months and in more than 90% of cases find that they fail to live up to expectations, according to The Stage’s nationwide survey, completed this week. Our survey, which was completed by more than 700 Stage readers, reveals almost half are still being charged a fee when they join an agency and that 63% of those are told this is purely for registration purposes - a clear breach of the law. Where a charge has been made for inclusion in a directory, the vast majority of people have also been told that this charge is compulsory, which goes against industry codes of practice. Some 36% of people were also asked to pay even more money for photographic services provided by the agency, with the majority - 64% - saying they were illegally told that they must use such services in order to join up.” There has never been a prosecution against agencies; that have taken up-front fees under false pretences; that have offered little work-seeking services.      Shame!  

 

Welcome to The Talented Cafe.

If this is your first visit, then you will have to register (Quite Painless and very Quick!) Come in and make your statement or comment, then start blogging!

The Author

Go to the Blog and have your say!

The Talented Cafe is linked to
Compnix & the Ancestral Trail Project